A summary on the novel live oak with moss by walt whitman

Live Oak, with Moss by Walt Whitman. Crossgrove, and a forward by Richard Tayson.

A summary on the novel live oak with moss by walt whitman

Two of these are line length and syntax. Using the syllable as the unit of measurement, the reader can find in the poem a rhythm of expansion and contraction. The first line is shorter than any other line except for the last. The longest lines, the fifth and sixth, are followed by three relatively short lines of fifteen syllables each.

Line 10 expands to twenty syllables, line 11 to twenty-five. Line 12 contracts to seventeen syllables, leading to the eight syllables of the eloquently concise last line. Syntax also contributes to rhythm. Each line is capable of standing alone as at least a complete sentence, and line 11 could be written as two sentences.

Yet only line 11 ends with a full stop of any kind, and the first period appears only at the end of the poem. The result is a rhythmically significant tension between sense and sound as the punctuation forbids the major pause at the end of the line that the sense would seem to call for.

Syntactical subtleties also produce effects beyond the rhythmic. An air of straightforward simplicity is suggested by the repeated use of the simple past tense in the early lines of the poem.The first full attempt to read "Live Oak, with Moss" was Helms's essay in Martin's The Continuing Presence of Walt Whitman (the one that contained the text of the no-comma "Live Oak with Moss").

Like Gay Wilson Allen, Helms emphasized the directness of the "Live Oak" sequence. What with Martin's endorsement and Stonum's affidavit in American Literary Scholarship , the world has been guaranteed that Whitman's original "Live Oak, with Moss" sequence is conveniently and faithfully printed in The Continuing Presence of Walt Whitman.

But it is not.

A summary on the novel live oak with moss by walt whitman

Whitman's Live Oak, With Moss Walt, is an intricate portrayal of love, both physical and mental. Throughout the poem, Whitman incorporates an array of metaphors symbolic of love and the many characteristics. Literature. STUDY. PLAY. Offer nothing more than simple facts, plain arguments and common sense divest himself of prejudice and prepossession" Walt Whitman "Live Oak, with Moss", an american, one of the roughs "There's a certain Slant of light, Winter Afternoons - That oppresses, like the Heft Of Cathedral Tunes -" Emily Dickenson.

“Live Oak, with Moss” by Walt Whitman was never published as a cohesive set of narrative poems. Instead, the poet incorporated the pieces into “Calamus” and Leaves of Grass. This paper was written while I was in a graduate research methods class with Steven Olsen-Smith, who is a noted scholar of Walt Whitman’s and Herman Melville’s work.

Walt Whitman’s Live Oak, With Moss, is an intricate portrayal of love, both physical and mental. Throughout the poem, Whitman incorporates an array of metaphors symbolic of love and the many characteristics associated with love.

Project MUSE - Walt Whitman's Songs of Male Intimacy and Love